BREAKING NEWS

What's new pussycats in Nailsea and nearby? This is mostly crime, court, human interest received too late for front page, weather and traffic updates - planning issues including new development(s), homes for sale all moved to Property Peeps pages. More immediate updates are on the Nailsea People Facebook page. Breaking news pages pre 2020 are in the archives...

2021

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Latest Covid data North Somerset

Recorded cases of coronavirus have continued to fall in North Somerset with 31 new cases have been identified in the latest seven-day period reported for North Somerset compared with 39 the previous week. 
Our case rate per 100,000 head of population has decreased to 14.4.

This compares with a South West figure of 13.8, and an England rate of 28.0. There is a lag in case data meaning the latest information is for the week ending Saturday, April 10.
You can see more details at www.n-somerset.gov.uk/lomp.
Case data is also available at national, regional, council and neighbourhood level at https://coronavirus.data.gov.uk/cases
The latest vacination figures published show that up to 15 April 64.21 per cent of North Somerset residents aged 16 and over have had at least one dose of the Covid-19 vaccination.

If you’re 45 or over you can now book online for your vaccination or call 119 without having to wait to be invited by your GP.
Anyone who lives or works in North Somerset without symptoms of coronavirus can collect free rapid tests to do themselves at home from a range of pharmacies and collection points across North Somerset.
A total of 38 North Somerset pharmacies with one in Backwell now offer the collection service alongside the mobile unit in the car park at the Scotch Horn Centre, Nailsea.
If you would rather take your test on site, where staff will process the results for you, our testing centres at Scotch Horn car park which is pen seven days a week 8.30am-5.30pm with late opening until 7.30pm on Tuesdays and Thursdays. 
Lots of premises must display an NHS QR code poster and ask anyone aged 16 and over to scan the code when visiting them.

This includes pubs, restaurants, leisure facilities, and salons.

If you don’t have a smart phone or you’re unable to scan the code, you'll need to leave your contact details in another way.

This is part of NHS Test and Trace and is for contact tracing purposes. It means businesses can react quickly to any cases of coronavirus and people can be notified if they might have been exposed to Covid-19 – helping to stop the spread.
Please be aware that if you’re visiting somewhere as a group (up to six people or two households), everyone in the group will have to check in. This is different from last year when one person could provide their info on behalf of the group.
Hospitality venues like pubs, bars and restaurants have a legal duty to refuse entry to anyone who won't give their contact details.
More guidance on the contact tracing requirements can be found at Gov.UK.

Nailsea cancels town council meetings 

HM the Queen is back at 'work' just days after the death of her husband HRH Prince Philip the Duke of Edinburgh but council meetings up and down the country remain cancelled.

The ever dutiful Queen Elizabeth II returns to royal duties on Wednesday, April 14, to mark the retirement of her household's most senior official Earl Peel.

The Duke of Edinburgh passed away peacefully at Windsor Castle aged 99 and the televised funeral details for Saturday are on the Nailsea People BMD page HERE.

Nailsea Town Council which is flying the Station Road Union flag at half-mast is among those whose scheduled Zoom meetings cannot go ahead due to national mourning after the death of Prince Philip.

The council cannot legally hold any meetings without giving three clear working days’ notice after issuing an agenda.

However, days during a period of national mourning are not classed as working days to allow sufficient notice.

Re-arranged dates including when the annual town meeting will be held have not been announced.

Deerie me, Trendywood wildlife

Janet Kay caught on camera three deer running out of Winchcombe Close, Nailsea, on a Saturday afternoon she described as ‘unusual’.

Janet said: “The deer passed us as we walked along Trendlewood Way, two continued up Birdlip Close (see second photo) while the third jumped its hooves hitting fences loudly as it gate-crashed a rear garden in Trendlewood Way.”

Nailsea People wonder if these are the deer who live on the fields behind The Uplands.

Janet added: “Hope the deer are okay?”

Up to five deer have been spotted grazing on the Backwell side of the rail track.

The photos prompted lots of comments on the Nailsea People Facebook page.

Patricia Adams said: “Hopefully people will see this post and take care when driving around this area. The bigger Nailsea grows and encroaches on their space, the greater the chance of us encountering wildlife.”

Kelly Leggett said: “I thought I saw something running in the road past my window, thought I was seeing things -s ee them most days in the field on Trendlewood.”

Sue Bales said: “Maybe they came from the same place as the fox that came into my back garden this week just off The Perrings.”

Julia Miners said: “The deeer recently lost their habitat/cover with huge amount of trees and hedges grubbed out lately.”

Stuart Burdge said the deer were seen running around the croquet lawns.

Dave Newcombe, of Winchcombe Close, said: “Deer come from the field near us.”

Sally Eyre who captured on camera the larger photo said: “They visited our garden also.”

Barclays withdraw from Nailsea

Barclays is closing its Nailsea branch

Following NatWest and HSBC another Nailsea bank is to close.

The High Street branch is to close on Friday, July 16 this year, three weeks after the Colliers Walk branch of HSBC.

One of the reasons given is it currently has less than 50 exclusive customers.

This leaves just Lloyds at Crown Glass Place as the only bank in the town.

A Barclay statement says: ‘The number of counter transactions has gone down in the previous 24 months, and additionally 86 per cent of our branch customers also use other ways to do their banking such as online and by telephone.

• Customers using other ways to do their banking has increased by 13% since 2015

• In the past 12 months, 14% of this branch's customers have been using nearby branches

• We’ve identified that only 49 customers use this branch exclusively for their banking.’

Barclays is also closing its Portishead branch a week earlier than Nailsea on Friday, July 9.

Read more here https://home.barclays/society/esg-resource-hub/reporting-and-disclosures/uk-branch-closures/.

Nailsea People posted the news on its Facebook page and within 24hrs it reached more than 6,000.

More than 100 people left a comment some outraged, others fearing another empty building which others thought it was the way of the world to move all business online.

Nailsea People does not know how many jobs will be lost.

Here is a selection of the comments:

Dalby James said: “Not to worry, it's going to make a great charity shop!”

John Rixon responded saying: “I wouldn’t bank on that.

“In Burnham the old Nat West is still empty after approximately three years, the old Barclays has just, again after another three years, got planning permission to become a Pizza Hut and the closed HSBC was recently raided by police and found to cannabis growing centre.”

Reflections manager Emma Silkston said: “I work directly opposite this bank.

“There is always a queue of customers, I don’t think it’s the same 50 day in day out.”

Richard Foggin said: “The move from high street branches to online platforms is so sad to see.”

Beth Connock said: “It is a shame, I’ve always found the staff so helpful.”

And Stephen Morten feared Lloyds bank would be next to close.

Patricia Adams lamented that Nailsea is ‘...an expanding town with no facilities...yay’.

Richard Hendricks said: “Absolutely disgraceful, my good lady and I have been Barclays customers for more than 40 years the only reason we haven’t used the branch recently is because of the pandemic.

“Appalling decision by Barclays.”

Jayne Ball called thedecision ‘dreadful’.

She added: “No thought to the many elderly people in Nailsea that rely on local services and are unable or  don’t feel comfortable with using internet banking.”

Michele Rickard said: “I don't see how they can use the past year in their statistics as once everything opens up I would presume they'd be busier.

“This last year has hardly been a typical year.

“I really feel for people that cannot do online banking and for people who have small businesses that need local banks, closing them is hardly customer focused.”

​Customer Clare Layton had a letter from Barclays this week telling her of the changes and she said: “Not surprised at all, I think it will end up with only Broadmead and Weston-super-Mare branches.”

Sue Ashman said: “It’s been open only two days a week for the past year because of covid and when you have to wait nearly 45 minutess to get it not good, surely when we get back to normal it will be busy.”

Mandy Roberts said: “The Post Office will be the way ahead for people who deal in cash, cheques and the like.

“The rest of us will have to cope with online banking or 'holes in the wall'.”

But Jason Ridge said: “If people in Nailsea weren’t so dead set against having new houses built then what do you expect to happen?

“People need to be more willing to accept changes or they’ll be forced to accept ones they don’t like.”

Cher Wilson said: “Where on earth are you supposed to get money out?”

Matthew O’Brien replied to Cher.

He said: “You get money from the cash points of which I'm sure there are

many in Nailsea or if not, the post office using your bank card or just use a bank card to pay for services.”

He said told by HSBC counter staff if a bank closes so does it ATM.

Annie Morgan said; “I recently did a new mortgage application all by webcam including passport proof.

“Not for everyone granted but perhaps worth calling to explain and see if there are alternatives, maybe posting for example?”

Morgan Steward said: “I have changed my bank once from Nat West to HSBC and now going to change to LLoyds in Nailsea.

“I have to present myself in person with proof of who I am then the changeover will be done through a phone transaction at my home.”

Amy Bartlett said: “As much as I appreciate this isn’t ideal for the older generation who are unable to use online banking, I do think perhaps it’s time to reassess how we bank.

“Barclays (as well as others) are huge funders of fossil fuels as well as other dubious industries.

“With everything now being done online it would be worth considering switching to a more ethical bank such as Starling or Monzo.

“I was with HSBC for more than 30 years (started with a kids Midland Bank account - they got me young!) and have recently made the switch.

“It was surprisingly easy.

“They change all your direct debits/standing orders for you - you really don’t have to do anything.”

Alan Robinson said: “I’m thinking of transferring my accounts to the only bank that remains in Nailsea, Lioyds.

“I popped in there and the lady said that they had been inundated with Barclay customers and have had to organise an appointment with a specific staff member to set up the transfer.

“No available slots all next week.”

Wendy Price said: “I was one who always thought everything banking could be done online.

“My mind was changed when I had to deal with a deceased relative’s estate.

“The staff in Lloyds Nailsea branch were excellent throughout the whole process.

“Online banking would not have cut it in these circumstances.”

The final post comes from some who calls themselves Cuppa Tiddi and gives much food for thought.

Cuppa said: "All banks are to close eventually.

"That is the government plan.

"Cash is being made obsolete.

"It will all be contactless payments or internet transfers.

"Before you decide to tell me I'm wrong I'll tell you why it's being done.

"Cash in hand jobs will be a thing of the past.

"There will be no more knocking off the cost of the VAT.

"Every penny you earn will be logged.

"No more making false claims.

"Not easy to buy/sell drugs, stolen goods or knocked off items, if you're tracked.

"Don't get me wrong, I'm not a fan.

"I work in the cash industry and this trend has put many of my colleagues out of a job, and one day soon it will do the same to me."

Latest coronavirus data

Recorded cases of coronavirus have continued to fall in North Somerset.
39 new cases have been identified in the latest seven-day period reported for North Somerset compared with 58 the previous week. Our case rate per 100,000 head of population has decreased to 18.1. This compares with a South West figure of 18.5, and an England rate of 37.
There is a lag in case data meaning the latest information is for the week ending Saturday, April 3.
You can see more detail on our local case data at www.n-somerset.gov.uk/lomp.
Case data is also available at national, regional, council and neighbourhood level at https://coronavirus.data.gov.uk/cases.
The latest figures published show that up to Thursday, April 8,  63.91% of North Somerset residents aged 16 and over have had at least one dose of the Covid-19 vaccination.
North Somerset Council-owned leisure centres open from Monday, April 12 so the rapid Covid-19 testing centre has moved into a temporary building in car park at Scotch Horn Centre.

No need to book and open 8.30am-5.30pm daily with 7.30pm late nights on Tuesday and Thursday.
For more information visit www.n-somerset.gov.uk/rapidtesting  
If you’re 50 or over you can now book online for your vaccination or call 119 without having to wait to be invited by your GP.
On Monday, April 12, step two of the government’s road map out of lockdown will come into effect.
This means:

  • people can continue to meet outside, either with one other household or within the ‘rule of six’, including in private gardens

  • everyone is advised to stay local as much as possible, continue to work from home, and avoid travel at the busiest times

  • non-essential retail can reopen

  • personal care, such as hairdressing and nail services, can restart

public buildings,including libraries and community centres, can reopen

  • indoor leisure facilities such as gyms can also reopen, but only for people on their own or in household groups

  • outdoor attractions, such as hospitality venues, zoos, theme parks and drive-in cinemas can reopen

  • self-contained accommodation such as campsites and holiday lets, where indoor facilities are not shared with other households, can also reopen

  • hospitality venues can serve people outdoors

  • funerals can continue with up to 30 people

  • weddings, receptions and commemorative events can be attended by up to 15 guests.

Council-run leisure centres in North Somerset will re-open on Monday, April 12, with Backwell following on Saturday, May 1 .

As well as Backwell, Hutton Moor in Weston-super-Mare, Scotch Horn in Nailsea, Parish Wharf at Portishead and Strode in Clevedon will all open their doors again following the relaxing of the government's lockdown restrictions.
North Somerset Council is working closely with the operators, Legacy Leisure and Places Leisure, to get the centres ready to re-open safely with restricted access following government guidelines, offering gym sessions and swimming in the first phase of re-opening. Read more in our news release.
The relaxing of lockdown restrictions means that from Monday, April 12, customers will be able to visit their local library to choose and borrow books using the self-service facilities.
Computers and printing facilities will be available to use by prior booking - contact your local library in advance by phone or email to make an appointment. Volunteers will be available to provide computer assistance remotely by telephone or video call.
Opening hours may be restricted, so people are advised to check before visiting. 
More information about the revised opening hours will be available from Monday, April 12, at www.n-somerset.gov.uk/librarycollect.
As the restrictions ease and venues reopen it is vital for businesses to provide every assurance to their customers that it is safe to return.

The easiest way to do this is to display a QR code poster and request.
Regulations were amended at the end of last month making it a legal requirement for restaurants, pubs and other venues in the tourism and hospitality sector as well as close contact businesses such as barbers, tailors or beauticians to collect customer, visitor and staff contact details for contact tracing purposes.Every individual must be requested to scan the NHS QR code or provide their contact details upon arrival, not just the lead member of the group.

It is anticipated that positive cases may increase once the restrictions are eased but you can control the impact on your business by using the enhanced tracing system so clusters and outbreaks can be responded to quickly. Customer, visitor and staff records are the key to supporting businesses reopening and staying open.

Displaying a QR Code poster at the entrance to your premises is now a legal requirement so that every person can receive timely public health advice if they may have been exposed to COVID-19.

You should make sure that all your staff have been notified of this change and understand that they are now required to ask all people entering the venue to scan the NHS QR code or provide their contact details. Exemptions include children under the age of 16 and people entering the venue for drop off / takeaway only.

More guidance on the requirements can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/maintaining-records-of-staff-customers-and-visitors-to-support-nhs-test-and-trace.
North Somerset Council will begin paying the new one-off Restart Grant to eligible retail, hospitality and leisure businesses next week.
The Chancellor announced the Restart Grant in the budget last month for businesses forced to close during the latest lockdown.
The Restart Grant replaces the Local Restrictions Support Grant (LRSG) and is a one-off payment to help businesses with re-opening and getting back on their feet as lockdown restrictions are relaxed.
North Somerset Council has a total fund of £10m to distribute.

The grants available are determined by the sector the business is in and its rateable value.

The grants are:

  • £2,667 for non-essential retail businesses with a rateable value of £15,000 or less

  • £4,000 for non-essential retail businesses with a rateable value between £15,000 and £51,000

  • £6,000 for non-essential retail businesses with a rateable value of £51,000 or above

  • £8,000 for hospitality and leisure properties with a rateable value of £15,000 or less

  • £12,000 for hospitality and leisure properties with a rateable value between £15,000 and £51,000

  • £18,000 for hospitality and leisure properties with a rateable value of £51,000 or above.

The council has this week completed its fraud checks and has contacted all 'rated' businesses that passed and that have historically been paid an LRSG (Closed) grant with instructions on how to apply for the Restart Grant via an online form.
An online claim form will also be available for any ’rated’ businesses that haven’t previously applied for an LRSG grant.
The council will also continue to offer discretionary awards to non-rated businesses and anticipates opening claims for this scheme later this month.
The council's dedicated business grants team can be contacted on 01934 888114 or email businessgrants@n-somerset.gov.uk.

PRETTY IN RED: A new bench seat is being installed on the corner of Link Road and High Street by Somerset Wood Recycling - not sure who is paying for it? And as an aside North Somerset Council emergency closure notice on the alley off the High Street which was blocked by a fallen stone wall has expired but access is still barred? Meanwhile as the council-owned leisure centres open on Monday, April 12 so the rapid Covid-19 testing centre has moved into a temporary building in car park at Scotch Horn Centre, no need to book and open 8.30am-5.30pm daily with 7.30pm late nights on Tuesday and Thursday

Speedy U-turn on rural roads

North Somerset Council is withdrawing plans to introduce a new Traffic Regulation Order on parts of the local rural lanes network to provide residents and road users with more opportunities to help shape the ‘quiet rural lanes’ proposals.

The proposals intend to make country lanes safer and more attractive for all who enjoy them, encouraging users to consider one another and take extra care to share the roads whether they’re on foot, in the saddle or behind the wheel.

These proposals would maintain normal access for local residents and support the economic recovery of local business by improving access for tourists and customers. It is hoped that the reduction in traffic would also help to protect the character, environment and biodiversity in sites of special scientific interest (SSSI) surrounding the rural lanes.

North Somerset Council executive member for planning, highways and transport James Tonkin is the Independent ward councillor for Nailsea West End.

He said: “Last week, the council invited residents to respond to plans to reduce volumes of traffic on rural roads using a Traffic Regulation Order.

“In this instance, we have not provided our communities with enough information about the objectives of the ‘quiet rural lanes’ proposals, and so the Traffic Regulation Order has caused understandable concern.

“This is not how we usually engage with our communities and we are sorry that, on this occasion, we’ve not provided the necessary information or context in advance of notices going up.

“So far, we have received a broad range of both positive and negative responses to the proposals. This has demonstrated and reiterated the importance of local views in taking them forward. As such, we are withdrawing the Traffic Regulation Order so we can offer a more inclusive and comprehensive package of engagement.

“We want to get it right on the ‘quiet rural lanes’ project and to do that we need to have the community with us and not against us. In putting residents at the forefront of our approach, that is exactly what we strive to do.”

The council will now develop new plans to engage with residents on the implementation of the Government funded ‘rural quiet lanes’ proposals.

These plans will include a range of forums where local people can respond, for example webinar and Q&A sessions like those currently scheduled for the other schemes promoting Active Travel in North Somerset.

The council will share details of the opportunities for community involvement in the coming days.

Lots of noise about quiet lanes

Our MP on lane closures

North Somerset MP Liam Fox waded into the debate and speaking from his home in Tickenham he said: "Banning cars from country lanes is the most crackpot idea yet to come out of North Somerset’s “rainbow coalition” council and should be strenuously opposed.

"For those who have not yet heard, North Somerset Council is proposing to restrict access by motor vehicles to the lanes between Clevedon, Yatton, Nailsea and Backwell in order to 'promote and enable greater Active Travel, particularly cycling and walking'.

”All this is part of the council’s plan for ‘making walking and cycling the natural choice for a cleaner, healthier and more active North Somerset by 2030.

"The roads are described as 'rat runs' by the council.

"While we would all encourage healthier activities such as walking and cycling, these plans seem to come from a different planet.

"These routes are used regularly by those who live around the edges of our towns as a legitimate means of transport. I know that many elderly drivers prefer using these routes to busier and more congested routes.

"The council asserts that “most journey lengths within the area will be perfectly suited to cycling, but the lanes will also be attractive to pedestrians and equestrians.

"Have they bothered to look at the age profile of many of those who live in the area?

"Forcing traffic out of the lanes in question is also likely to result in greater congestion through our towns with slower traffic, more air pollution and greater hazards for children attending our schools.

"It is not difficult to imagine, for example, what more traffic at peak times would mean for parents and pupils trying to get to and from schools in Backwell, Yatton or Tickenham.

"Having slower traffic (producing greater pollution) travelling through the congestion points in our towns hardly seems to fulfil the councils own aim which is stated as 'Given the climate emergency and NSC's own target to become carbon neutral by 2030, we see this an essential means to help make this happen'.

”While we all want to see effective action on climate change, I simply do not believe that the council’s plans will have the effect they seek.

"As a regular user of many of these routes over the past 30 years I have to fully agree with a constituent who wrote to me that 'I have lived in Yatton all my life and use these roads regularly. They are a lifeline to local people and are not rat runs as I have seen described by a local councillor. I have used them in my car and on my bicycle and never had a problem. Drivers, horse riders and cyclists and runners/walkers share these roads well'.

”This echoes the views of many of those who have written (though many have been much less polite about the council’s plans!).

"The countryside must continue to be an economically viable area and not seen to be somewhere where people simply go for recreation. I wonder if some on North Somerset Council understand the nature of our area outside the most urban areas.

"There will also be the considerable issue of how such a policy will be policed. Will we really divert the activities of Avon and Somerset "Constabulary Into ensuring that cars do not drive on country roads at a time when the police far greater priorities? It would also be interesting to know how much such a scheme, including its policing, is intended to cost the council taxpayers of North Somerset, something that seems to be notably missing in the consultation period.

"The proposed scheme to close rural roads in North Somerset to motor vehicles is the most crackpot idea yet to come out of North Somerset’s “rainbow coalition” council and should be strenuously opposed.

"If you are against these proposals then please contact me via my website: https://www.liamfox.co.uk/contact

"You can see the full proposals (such as they are) HERE.

"Please note the consultation process ends on Friday, April 30.".

Down the lane

Bristol Post reporter Heather Pickstock who lives in a rural lane Wraxall spells out the council plan to ban traffic from rural roads in North Somerset.
She penned the follow article under the heading 'Council plans to make rural lanes between Clevedon, Yatton, Nailsea and Backwell traffic free'.
Traffic could be banned from rural lanes across parts of North Somerset - in a bid to promote cycling and walking.
North Somerset Council has announced plans to make rural lanes between Clevedon, Yatton, Nailsea and Backwell traffic free.
The move would see roads in areas including Backwell Bow, Moor Lane and Court Lane in Clevedon and Davis Lane in Kenn become vehicle free zones.
Council highways bosses say the move would help them in their aim to increase walking and cycling across the district by 200 per cent by 2030.
Authority bosses have now applied for a traffic regulation order to prohibit vehicles - particularly HGVs - from the roads and a consultation on the plans runs until the end of April.
There are also plans to look at introducing physical measures to block off the lanes to traffic, although this will be subject to further consultation.
The plans are included in the authority’s Active Travel Strategy with the vision to make ‘walking and cycling the natural choice for a cleaner, healthier and more active North Somerset.’
Essential motor vehicle access would still be allowed to homes and businesses in the affected areas.
A council spokesman said: “To support our strategy, our intention is to address rat running and inappropriate use, especially HGV use, of our rural lanes network while continuing to allow essential motor vehicle access to frontages and businesses.
"The council is proposing to restrict access by motor vehicles to the lanes between Clevedon, Yatton, Nailsea and Backwell in order to promote and enable greater active travel, particularly walking and cycling.
“For example, residents, landowners, businesses, pubs and hospitality venues will continue to have motor vehicle access for all their needs and those of visitors, clients, employees and suppliers and customers.
“The resulting reduction in the traffic will create a more pleasant, inviting and safer environment for active travel while preserving the rural nature of the area and providing protection from increasing traffic growth resulting from further development pressures.”
The lanes network is well used by local residents wanting to avoid main roads as a cut through between the towns and villages.
They often get gridlocked when there are issues with the M5 and local roads get congested as a result.
The plans - known as the Rural Lane Active Travel Enforcement Scheme - will be funded with money from the Department for Transport’s Active Travel Fund.
The measures could also be supported by reducing speed limits, introducing ‘entrance gateways’, traffic calming and introducing physical measures to close roads to vehicles.
Council bosses say the desire for safer walking, cycling and horse riding routes was highlighted as a result of the first national lockdown as a result of the coronavirus pandemic.
The spokesman added: “This will build on the huge demand for cycling and walking routes that was demonstrated in the first covid lockdown.
“By going through this process we expect to transform the feel of these lanes so that they become a viable option for many more local residents to travel actively between the communities connected by this rural network.
“Most journey lengths within the area will be perfectly suited to cycling but the lanes will also be attractive to pedestrians and equestrians and improve access to the countryside.
“This will build on the huge latent demand for cycling and walking that was demonstrated in the first covid lockdown.”
The authority said the move would also help it achieve its target of becoming carbon neutral by 2030.

Council leader on lanes

Hundreds of North Somerset people took to social media during the Easter bank holiday weekend to voice their opinions about proposed changes in traffic access to countryside lanes - see map.

Although sometimes reasoned and sensible it ended up as a sometimes nasty debates on Facebook pages with party politics playing a part and entrenched ideas leading to a car drivers v cyclist spat.

North Somerset Council leader Don Davies who is the Independent ward councillor for Pill issued spoke out.

He said: "It won’t surprise you to learn that there are mixed concerns and aspirations regarding this proposal amongst councillors.

"No doubt, there will be a a similar mix of differing views within the wider community.

"That’s why the proposals are being submitted for public scrutiny and consultation.

"Cleary, there will be those who support the proposals and those who object.

"There will also be a considerable number who may support elements of the ‘idea’ in principle - but will want amendments made to key aspects of it.

"There’s no doubt that the feedback we receive will do a great deal to guide and inform the way forward.

"And it is strange that Dr Fox is in opposition to his PM."

Further reading HERE.

Quiet lanes across moors

Around the end of April or in May North Somerset Council will consult on a proposal to establish a rural lanes network of cycle and pedestrian routes between Yatton, Clevedon, Nailsea and Backwell.

The proposal may include point closures to through traffic using modal gating (while maintaining essential and farm access) to reduce traffic flows and rat-running along the flat network of moor roads and lanes linking Yatton with Clevedon, Nailsea, Backwell and National Cycle Network 33.

Read more here: https://northsomersetlife.wordpress.com/.../nearly.../amp/

The roads across North Somerset which could become traffic free

  • Backwell Bow, Backwell - its entire length.

  • Backwell Common, Backwell - its entire length.

  • Chapel Hill, Backwell - its entire length.

  • Chelvey Road, Backwell - its entire length. Woodwards Close, Backwell - its entire length.

  • Brockley Lane, Brockley - its entire length.

  • Brockley Way, Brockley - its entire length.

  • Chelvey Lane, Brockley - its entire length. Chelvey Road, Brockley - its entire length. Brockley Way, Cleeve - its entire length.

  • Littlewood Lane, Cleeve - its entire length.

  • Court Lane, Clevedon - its entire length.

  • Manmoor Lane, Clevedon - its entire length.

  • Moor Lane, Clevedon - from Court Lane to its termination east of M5 J19 (a length of approx. 260m).

  • Davis Lane, Kenn - its entire length.

  • Duck Lane, Kenn - its entire length.

  • Kenn Street, Kenn - its entire length.

  • Kennmoor Road, Kenn - its entire length.

  • Manmoor Lane, Kenn - its entire length. Nailsea Wall, Kenn - its entire length.

  • Chelvey Road, Nailsea - its entire length.

  • Lodge Lane, Nailsea – from Backwell Bow to its junction with Elm Lodge Road.

  • Nailsea Moor Lane, Nailsea - its entire length.

  • Nailsea Wall, Nailsea - its entire length. Nailsea Wall Lane, Nailsea - its entire length. Netherton Wood Lane, Nailsea - its entire length.

  • West End Lane, Nailsea - its entire length.

  • Youngwood Lane, Nailsea - its entire length.

  • Lodge Lane, Wraxall and Failand - from Backwell Bow to its junction with Elm Lodge Road.

  • Brockley Way, Yatton - from its boundary with the parish of Brockley to its junction with Lower Claverham Road.

  • Claverham Drove, Yatton – its entire length.

  • Ham Lane, Yatton – its entire length.

  • Kennmoor Road, Yatton – its entire length.

  • Moor Road, Yatton - from its junction with Kenn Moor Road to its junction with Claverham Drove.

Latest Covid-19 figures and advice

On Monday, March 29, step one of the government’s road map out of lockdown will be completed, allowing groups of up to six people, or two households, to meet outside.

The new rules will see residents able to start reconnecting with their friends and family, but vital Covid guidance, such as washing hands, wearing face coverings, and making space, will still be essential in keeping infection rates low in North Somerset.

With lockdown restrictions starting to ease, and our excitement to get back to normal as quickly as possible, it may be tempting to skip ahead.

But moving faster, and doing those things ahead of the government’s timetable, could put us back into lockdown, and will risk lives.

We’ve all seen how fast things can change, and how disappointing it feels when that happens.

Case rates in North Somerset have fallen thanks to everyone who has stayed home and followed the guidance. It has not been easy, and we thank each and every person who has kept going, even when it has been difficult.

It’s vitally important we all keep playing our part and doing what we know works. Stay more than 2m away from people you don’t live with, even when you’re meeting outside, wash your hands often, and wear a face covering if you can.

Following those basic Covid precautions we’ve all been practising for the last year will be essential to safely unlocking, even if you’ve been vaccinated or had a recent negative Covid-19 test.

We don’t want to risk the gains we’ve made by trying to jump ahead of the step by step approach.

It is also extremely important that anyone who has a new continuous cough, a temperature, or a change in their sense of taste or smell self-isolate straight away and get a symptomatic test, even if they think the symptoms are down to something else like a cold or recent vaccination side effects.

By taking it slowly and sticking to the basics we will continue to look after each other and reduce the risk of future outbreaks in North Somerset.

Latest coronavirus data

Recorded cases of coronavirus have continued to fall in North Somerset with 58 new cases have been identified in the latest seven-day period reported for North Somerset compared with 91 the previous week.

Our case rate per 100,000 head of population has decreased to 27.0.

This compares with a South West figure of 28.4, and an England rate of 55.5.

There is a lag in case data meaning the latest information is for the week ending Saturday, Martch 20.

You can see more detail on our local case data by following this link:

www.n-somerset.gov.uk/lomp.

Case data is also available at national, regional, council and neighbourhood level is at:

 https://coronavirus.data.gov.uk/cases

Health bosses spell out new rules

Health leaders in North Somerset are urging people to take it slow as the country continues to ease out of national lockdown restrictions.

On Monday 29 March step one of the government’s road map out of lockdown will be completed, allowing groups of up to six people, or two households, to meet outside.

The new rules will see residents able to start reconnecting with their friends and family, but vital Covid guidance, such as washing hands, wearing face coverings, and making space, will still be essential in keeping infection rates low in North Somerset.

North Somerset Council executive member for health Mike Bell is the Liberal Democrat ward councillor for Weston-super-Mare Central.

He said: “With lockdown restrictions starting to ease, and our excitement to get back to normal as quickly as possible, it may be tempting to skip ahead.

“But moving faster, and doing those things ahead of the government’s timetable, could put us back into lockdown, and will risk lives.

“We’ve all seen how fast things can change, and how disappointing it feels when that happens.

“So, it’s vitally important we all keep playing our part and doing what we know works. Stay more than 2m away from people you don’t live with, even when you’re meeting outside, wash your hands often, and wear a face covering if you can.”

From Monday:

  • people can meet outside, either with one other household or within the ‘rule of six’, including in private gardens

  • the stay at home rule is ending – but with advice to stay local as much as possible, continue to work from home, and avoid travel at the busiest times

  • outdoor sport facilities will re-open, including golf courses and tennis and basketball courts, and formally organised outdoor sports can restart

  • Weddings can take place, attended by up to six people.

​Director of Public Health, Matt Lenny, said: “Case rates in North Somerset have fallen thanks to everyone who has stayed home and followed the guidance.

"It has not been easy and we thank each and every person who has kept going, even when it has been difficult.

"Following those basic Covid precautions we’ve all been practising for the

last year will be essential to safely unlocking, even if you’ve been vaccinated or had a recent negative Covid-19 test."We don’t want to risk the gains we’ve made by trying to jump ahead of the step by step approach.

“It is also extremely important that anyone who has a new continuous cough, a temperature, or a change in their sense of taste or smell self-isolate straight away and get a symptomatic test, even if they think the symptoms are down to something else like a cold or recent vaccination side effects.

“By taking it slowly and sticking to the basics we will continue to look after each other and reduce the risk of future outbreaks in North Somerset.”

Covid-19 tests for anyone who has symptoms of the virus – a new continuous cough, loss of or change in sense of taste or smell, or a high temperature – can be booked at www.gov.uk/get-coronavirus-test or by calling 119.

Information about practical and financial support available for anyone who needs to self-isolate can be found at www.n-somerset.gov.uk/together   

Remembering Bailee fundraising raffle

A charity fundraising raffle in memory of Bailee Cook has been overwhelmed with generous donations from Nailsea people.

Since Golden Valley Primary School pupil Bailee Cook died aged four in April 2018 his family and friends have been remembering him in lots of ways this includes supporting Bristol Children’s Hospital and The Lily Foundation, which funds research into Mitochondrial Disease and other metabolic disorders.

Raffle organisers Charlie Amos and Andie Hancock, who are best friends with Bailee’s mum Jemma Capern, set up a Facebook page and a Just Giving page for the latest fundraiser.

By giving to the charity every pound will qualify for one raffle ticket although people can opt just to donate.

Andie said: “Everyone has been so generous!

"We cannot thank everyone enough for donating prizes and purchasing tickets/donating to the JustGiving page!

“To purchase tickets, please pop your donation on the Just Giving page which has a link to The Lily Foundation.”

Mitochondrial disease is the term given to a group of medical disorders caused by mutations in mitochondria, the tiny organelles that are present in nearly every cell in our bodies and which generate about 90 per cent of the energy we need to live.

Mitochondrial diseases affect people in multiple ways, depending on which cells are affected. This can make the condition hard to diagnose, as symptoms often resemble those of other serious illnesses.

Any of the body's organs and systems can be affected including the brain, heart, lungs, gut, liver and skin.

There is currently no cure.

Since Bailee's death mum Jemma and dad Lee Cook, who are also parents to Gracie-Leigh, 10 and Darcie, two, together with family and friends have raised thousands of pounds for research.

This includes monies from a pub shopping mall at the Ring O'Bells; wear Blue For Bailee day including £614 from Golden Valley Primary School; £100 from Trendlewood Church which has gone to The Wallace & Gromit Grand Appeal at Bristol Children's Hospital; and a Hallowe’en party at the Grove Sports Centre & Social Club.

The draw is going to be ‘live’ on FaceTime on Friday morning, April 23, and Charlie has devised a novel ‘wheel of fortune’ to choose winners. Jemma’s sister Steph is putting together an additional prize of a hamper to be won.

From beauty products to scented candles; from artwork to craftwork; from bumper bakery treats to surprise gift vouchers; the list of prizes is endless and a VERY big thank you goes to all who have given.

Nailsea People had the intention of listing all donations but the ‘list’ was too long!

Charlie said: "I just am so thankful to everyone who had donated so far.

"Bailee was so important to a lot of people so if we can raise money in his name then that's amazing.

"Every penny will help another family and help with more research.

Learn more here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/147733913812747 (due to FB rules it has to be private group so wait to be invited in)

BEAUTIFUL BOY: Bailee Cook

Latest Covid-19 data for mid March

Ninety one new cases have been identified in the latest seven-day period reported for North Somerset compared with 77 the previous week.

Our case rate per 100,000 head of population has increased from 35.8 last week to 42.3 now.

This compares with a South West figure of 31.0, and an England rate of 58.3.

Now the rolling rate of coronavirus cases has dropped from the peak we saw in January, we will see fluctuations over time.

The small increase this week is a reminder that as we start to unlock, we need to take things slowly.

There is a lag in case data meaning the latest information is for the week ending Saturday, March 6.

You can see more detail on our local case data at www.n-somerset.gov.uk/lomp.

Case data is also available at national, regional, council and neighbourhood level at https://coronavirus.data.gov.uk/cases.

Don’t forget the rapid test centre at Scotch Horn Centre is open seven days a week from 8.30am-5pm, with evening opening until 7.30pm on Tuesdays and Thursdays.

The latest figures published show that up to 14 March 50.27% of North Somerset residents aged 16 and over have had at least one dose of the Covid-19 vaccination.

You can view vaccination data on the NHS website.  

If you’re 50 or over you can now book online for your vaccination without having to wait to be invited by your GP or call 119.

 When false information is shared, it can take on a life of its own and have serious consequences. Recently there has been a lot of false information about the Covid-19 vaccine.

If you want to challenge posts the government has developed a social media toolkit to share resources to help stop the spread of misinformation.

The toolkit includes short and shareable posts, videos, animations and quotes encouraging people to fact-check information before sharing online, as well as simple tips.

The NHS website is the best source of information about the Covid vaccine.

Did you know Nailsea has its own repair shop run by volunteers.

Unfortunately, Nailsea Shedders bid to set up a workshop next to the car park at Grove Sports & Social Club was thwarted over negotiations on the terms of the lease with Nailsea Town Council.

Spokesman Phill Wheatley said although supportive councillors they could not agree on the length of a lease.

Phil said: “After eight years of trying to find a local base we will now have to look outside Nailsea and are currently in discussions with Wraxall Village Club.”

Its popular ‘click, collect and return’ repair/commission service will hopefully be back at the beginning of April, added Phil.

Despite lockdown a small number of jobs have been completed including mending a retro coffee machine and model railway 00-gauge baseboards. Its garden tool sharpening service should resume soon.
Phil added: “We are looking at making some vegetable trugs, garden containers, bird boxes and/or bird tables and anyone interested can email:

nailseashedders2@btinternet.com.”

Nailsea Shedders is a registered charity which runs along the lines of a 'Repair Cafe', affiliated to the United Kingdom Mens Sheds Association (UKMSA) but are multi gendered with 40 per cent of members are women.

Formed in February 2014 along with its social aspects they fix, mend, repair and repurpose items that may otherwise be binned.

The group has its own Facebook page.

Big Brother CCTV in Nailsea

CCTV in Nailsea has a long and checkered history but this year all should be sorted when anyone up to mischief in our town centre will be caught on film.

The plan is for the long-anticipated CCTV system upgrade to go live in the next week.

There will be 12 new digital cameras dotted around the town monitored by a control room in Weston-super-Mare.

As well as Nailsea’s old analogue CCTV cameras those in Weston-Super-Mare, Clevedon and Portishead have been replaced with the state-of-the-art digital ones.

Each town council has paid to replace their own cameras – a total of 72 across North Somerset – with Nailsea Town Council paying for its 12.

The cameras will allow for better and clearer images, some with 360-degree coverage.

The high-definition wireless cameras will also have automatic vehicle registration identification linked to police databases to help with prosecutions.

One camera located in Millennium Park will include a microphone and illuminator that the police will be able to switch on if suspicious activity is spotted.

 

Nailsea Town Council planning committee chairman Rod Lees said: “Nailsea is already a safe place to live and work.

“The new digital CCTV system will give clearer imagery and allow North Somerset Council to monitor and relay these images to the police, who will be able to watch them live needed.

“This is a massive improvement for Nailsea as it will cover more areas in the town.”

As part of the upgrade, funding for a separate mobile camera has been agreed to allow a remote camera to be deployed to hotspots across Portishead, Clevedon and Nailsea to deal with crime and anti-social behaviour.

The upgrade for the system has been a high priority for Nailsea Town Council for many years, with former councilor James Steel playing a strong part in securing this.

Nailsea neighbourhood sergeant, Mark Raby said: “The improved cameras will help us keep people safe and identify offenders in the town.

“The AVS (advanced visual system) will also allow us to track and identify vehicles used in anti-social activity and crime.”

“The final technicalities are currently being worked on by broadband provider Virgin to increase the band width capacity and ensure signals being relayed.

“We’ll let people know as soon as they are operational.”

  • A decade ago Nailsea Town Council was threatened with legal action if it didn’t pay a nearly £9,000 backdated bill for CCTV cameras. The shock demand arrived unexpectedly on the council doormat after two CCTV cameras were installed. The town council had put in 11 cameras at specific vantage points in 1999. And in 2001 it ordered another two from BT. It is believed an errant accountant forgot to invoice the town council for £8,802 for six years worth of circuit lines for the additional cameras. Because of a legal anomaly BT can only try to claim for a six year period and not the full nine years it forgot to bill the town council.

  • In January 2020 it was discovered that both North Somerset Council and Nailsea Town Council were paying the electricity bill for its CCTV cameras at a cost of around £1,200 a quarter. It is not known how long both authorities had been footing the same bill. Unfortunately, under regulator rules, the town council can only claim back the past 14 months of payments.

North Somerset Council say the total cost of the 2020-21 upgrade is nearly half a million pounds.

It is believed the running cost for Nailsea Town Council will be approximately £20,000 per annum.

The mobile camera is a shared extra cost of up to £7,000 with additional running costs per annum.

PHOTO: Last CCTV camera going up in the Station Road car park, Nailsea 

Peter's CHSW sponsored haircut

Nailsea School student Peter Colley wanted to do something to raise funds for Children’s Hospice South West (CHSW) during the pandemic and decided he would have a sponsored ‘isolation buzz cut’.

Peter, aged 12, said: “All charities, including CHSW, have suffered due to Covid-19 and the cancelling of events.

"I wanted to raise money for them because it means a lot to our family.”

So far Peter has raised £320 for CHSW, which provides respite, emergency, end-of-life and bereavement care and support for the whole family.

It has adapted its care during the pandemic to ensure Covid-safe support wherever and whenever families need it, including for the first time ever, in families’ own homes.

You can show your support for Peter and donate to his fundraising page here www.justgiving.com/fundraising/Peter-Colley2

CHSW is celebrating its 30th anniversary in 2021.

The charity was founded in 1991 and has provided a safe haven of care, support and friendship for thousands of children with life-limiting conditions and their families.

The photographs show Peter before and after his buzz cut.

CHSW is celebrating its 30th anniversary in 2021.

The charity was founded in 1991 and has provided a safe haven of care, support and friendship for thousands of children with life-limiting conditions and their families.

The photographs show Peter before and after his buzz cut

Children’s Hospice South West (CHSW)

  • Children’s Hospice South West was first registered with the charity commission in 1991 and is celebrating its 30th Anniversary in 2021

  • It is dedicated to making the most of short and precious lives, providing the best possible hospice care for life-limited children and their families

  • There are three hospices in the South West: Little Bridge House in Barnstaple (opened 1995), Charlton Farm in Wraxall  (opened 2007) and Little Harbour in St Austell (opened 2011)

  • CHSW is the only children’s hospice in the South West. It costs around £11million to run the three hospice sites each year and the charity relies almost entirely on voluntary contributions

  • CHSW delivers a range of services including short breaks, specialist play, music therapy, activities for siblings, palliative and emergency care, end of life care, bereavement support and specialist medical care - all available 24 hours a day, 365 days a year

  • The services are free for families. To find out more about its work go to www.chsw.org.uk.

Latest coronavirus data

Recorded cases of coronavirus have continued to fall in North Somerset.
107 new cases have been identified in the latest seven-day period reported for North Somerset compared with 169 the previous week. 
Our case rate per 100,000 head of population has continued to decrease and is now 49.8 compared with a South West figure of 46.1, and an England rate of 86.4.
There is a lag in case data meaning the latest information is for the week ending Saturday, February 27.
You can see more detail on our local case data at www.n-somerset.gov.uk/lomp.
Case data is also available at national, regional, council and neighbourhood level at https://coronavirus.data.gov.uk/cases
The vaccination programme has now started to invite people aged 60 and over for their first dose.
Anyone aged 60+ can book their vaccination online or call 119. 
Anyone else in eligible vaccination groups should wait to be contacted by the NHS..

The latest NHS data shows that up to Sunday, February 28, 79,445 people in North Somerset have been vaccinated with at least one dose.
You can find the vaccination figure reports on the NHS website.

LEAKED NEWS: Backwell Green Party councillor Bridget Petty says work has begun repairing the swimming pool - the roof needs fixing and the boiler replacing. Mrs Petty who is North Somerset Council executive member for climate emergency and the environment , posted on the Backwell Resistance Facebook page: "I for one am craving a swim and I know many residents are too." Below is how Nailsea People reported the closure last summer of the leisure centre and hopes for a Nailsea pool pre-district council elections back in May 2015...

Elderly Backwell victim of distraction burglary

Police are reminding people of security advice following a distraction burglary in Backwell earlier this week.

At approximately 2.30-3.30pm, on Tuesday, February 16, an elderly woman living near Station Road, received a knock on her front door from a male who said he was delivering shopping to her.

The woman, who is in her 90s, said she had not made an order and refused to accept the goods. He said he could only accept her refusal if she wrote a note to that effect and while she went into another room to do so, her handbag was taken from the hallway.

The male is described as being in his mid-to-late teens, approximately 5ft 3-5in, with short straight black hair. He did not have any facial hair.

PC Nikki Adams, of Operation Remedy team, said: “Distraction burglars often target the most vulnerable or elderly, believing they are likely to be the most trusting.

“Although we believe this is an isolated incident at this time, we’d urge everyone to be aware of the signs of doorstep crime and to raise awareness with family and friends to prevent similar occurrences.

“Anyone who saw what happened, or has experienced a similar call, should contact police on 101 giving reference number 5221034194.”

  • Nailsea People has heard of another unconfirmed  report of a burglary this week in one of the homes which back onto Stockway South opposite Wetherspoons; and

  • Weston police would like to thank a witness whose call reporting a suspected burglary in progress led to two arrests. Police were told of someone breaking into the bike store for the flats in The Runway, Weston-super-Mare, and spotting two people acting suspiciously. A man and a teenage boy were both arrested and are in custody at this time on suspicion of burglary and going equipped for theft by 1.05am. 

How to prevent doorstep crime:

  • If you are not sure who is at your door, do not open it or let anyone into your home. Where possible, have a safety chain, intercom or video doorbell/viewer fitted and always attach the chain/use the intercom before opening the door to strangers.

  • Check the identity of the caller by calling the company they claim to be from. Use the numbers listed in the phone book or website. Do not use any phone numbers provided by the caller – they may be bogus.

  • Call a neighbour or friend nearby to come along and check out the visitor if unsure.

  • If somebody asks for your help, needs to make a phone call, needs a drink or pen and paper etc, make them wait outside and while you’re away from your door, close and lock it. Remember: it is your doorstep, your decision.

For more information, visit www.avonandsomerset.police.uk/crime-prevention-advice

With more than 15 million people now having received the Covid vaccination nationally, and our own local rates of infection dropping, we are beginning to see the hopeful signs of brighter days ahead of us. 
Our hospitals remain under pressure, but the numbers of patients with Covid-19 is starting to decrease.

On Monday the Prime Minister will set out the government’s road map out of the current restrictions. Once we know the details we’ll ensure that we’re making provisions locally for the unlocking of the economy in a supported way, and for the changes needed in our own services. 

Latest coronavirus case data
Recorded cases of coronavirus have continued to fall in North Somerset since last week’s update and we have now dropped below the regional average. 
193 new cases have been identified in the latest seven day period reported for North Somerset compared with 307 the previous week. Our case rate per 100,000 head of population has continued to decrease and is now 89.7 compared with a South West figure of 93.7 and an England rate of 137.8. 
There is a lag in case data meaning the latest information is for the week ending Saturday 13 February. 
You can see more detail on our local case data at www.n-somerset.gov.uk/lomp. 
Case data is also available at national, regional, council and neighbourhood level at https://coronavirus.data.gov.uk/cases 

Covid-19 vaccinations moving to next phase 
Local health and care organisations are moving to the next stage of the local Covid- 19 vaccine programme after offering vaccinations to everyone in the top four priority groups, as set by the Joint Committee for Vaccinations and Immunisations (JCVI), across Bristol, North Somerset and South Gloucestershire (BNSSG). 
Vaccinations are now available to people in three priority groups. They are people aged 65 – 69, people aged 16 – 64 who are classified as clinically vulnerable because they have a range of clinical conditions identified by the JCVI that increase their risk from Covid-19, and people recently added to the updated Shielded Patient List. 
If you are in any of these three groups you will be contacted to book your vaccination appointment. 
People aged 65-69 are being encouraged to book appointments at Ashton Gate Vaccination Centre or at one of seven local community pharmacies. This can be done by logging on to the national booking service at www.nhs.uk/covid-vaccination or calling 119. 
GP-led vaccination sites will focus initially on the clinically vulnerable because of the relationship between general practice and those with long term conditions, and continuity of care. 
People aged between 65 and 69 who have also been added to the Shielded Patient List will have the option of booking an appointment at Ashton Gate or community pharmacy, or waiting to be contacted by their GP. 
There’s still opportunity for anyone in the top four priority groups who hasn’t been vaccinated to book an appointment. Please use the national booking system to book your vaccine, or contact your local GP. 
Local people are being asked not to contact any vaccination site or visit them without an appointment. 
For more information about the roll-out of the vaccination programme in BNSSG - including full details of the vaccination locations and travel support - please visit the Healthier Together website. 

Vaccinations pass 15 million milestone nationally, but what about the local picture…? 
Over 15 million vaccines have now been administered nationally and everyone in the top four priority groups has been offered the first dose of the vaccine. 
These groups account for 88 per cent of deaths from COVID-19, meaning potentially tens of thousands of lives will be saved. 
This week the Prime Minister has also outlined the Government's intention to offer a vaccination to everyone in the first nine priority groups, including everyone over 50 by May and all adults by September. 
As a council we will be working to encourage vaccine take-up and ensure equal access in our communities. 
In the BNSSG area, vaccinations are continuing to be offered at pace. Up until 14 February, 220,551 people had received their first dose. You can view vaccination data on the NHS website. 

1.7m more people asked to shield 
On Tuesday the government announced that it would be asking an extra 1.7m people to begin shielding following a review of the evidence since the start of the pandemic about which people are more likely to become very unwell as a result of COVID-19 infection. 
There are already 2.3m people already on the shielding list, bringing the total to 4m. 
The people who are now being asked to shield for the first time have been identified based on a calculation which takes a number of factors into account including ethnicity, deprivation (by postcode), weight, age, underlying health issues and prescribed medications. 
The advice to shield is applicable until the end of March. 
Anyone who is now being advised to shield will be sent letters by the NHS informing them of their new status, which means they are entitled to statutory sick pay, prioritisation for online shopping slots and help collecting medicines.
They will also be prioritised for coronavirus vaccination and should expect to be called forward for their vaccination sooner than previously anticipated. About half of the 1.7m now being added to the list will have already received their first injection as they are over 70. 
Help is available locally for people who need additional support during the pandemic through the North Somerset Together network www.n-somerset.gov.uk/together. 

Local testing facilities 
Twice weekly Covid-19 community testing Anyone who can’t work from home can get tested twice a week if they don’t have symptoms of coronavirus. 
The extra testing helps people who need to continue to work outside the home in lockdown - such as in shops, providing childcare, in homes, on sites, or on public transport - to keep themselves and their families safe by reducing the spread of Covid-19. 
Testing is available at: 
• Scotch Horn Leisure Centre, Nailsea 
• Somerset Hall, Portishead 
• Hutton Moor Leisure Centre, Weston. 

All three sites operate seven days a week 8.30am-5pm, with evening opening until 7.30pm on Tuesdays and Thursdays. 
Anyone living or working in North Somerset without symptoms of Covid-19 can get tested at one of the three centres. 
Find out more and book a test at www.n-somerset.gov.uk/rapidtesting 
Symptomatic testing Anyone with symptoms of Covid-19 – new continuous cough, loss of or change in sense of taste or smell, or a high temperature – should self-isolate and book a test at www.gov.uk/get-coronavirus-test or by calling 119. 
You should book even if you have a recent negative rapid test result. 
This gives access to a symptomatic test, which can be carried out at Locking Road car park, Weston-super-Mare, or Castlewood, Clevedon. 
Locking Road is open 8am-8pm seven days a week can be used by people arriving for their appointment on foot as well as by car. Free parking is available for those being tested. 
A mobile testing unit (MTU) runs from Castlewood in Clevedon but can only accept appointments by car.

Bristol and South Glos surge testing ends this week 
This week is the final week of community coronavirus surge testing in Bristol and South Gloucestershire following the identification of cases related to the Kent variant in those areas. 
As at 16 February, over 33,500 tests had been carried out in Bristol and South Gloucestershire which is around 20 per cent of people who are eligible. More than 14,700 tests had been carried out at the six mobile testing units (MTUs) set up, while over 18,700 tests were returned to Collect and Drop sites. This is a very beneficial sample size which will help increase national and local understanding of this change in the virus. 
Of the 33,500 tests completed up to 16 February, around one per cent tested positive for COVID-19. All positive tests found in surge testing areas are sent for genomic sequencing to determine whether any additional cases of the variant of concern have been identified. The genomic sequencing process typically takes around two weeks, so we’d expect to see results in the next week or so from the surge testing in Bristol and South Gloucestershire. 

Personal Assistants can access regular testing 
Directly employed or self-employed carers who support people in their own homes are now entitled to regular weekly PCR testing. This applies to all personal assistants (PAs) in England who provide care and support to individuals in their own homes, where they come within 2m of the person they care for. 
PAs can now order a month’s supply of test PCR kits every 28 days, delivered to their home address, enabling them to conduct weekly coronavirus testing at home. 
There is more information on accessing the kits on the government website as well as the opportunity to sign up for webinars on Thursday 25 February or Wednesday 3 March. 

Prohibition notice for Weston business 
This week we have served a prohibition notice on a Weston town centre business which has failed to comply with lockdown rules. 
The vape shop, Steam Chasers in Baker Street, has been opening its premises to customers but is not classed as essential retail. 
Opening the premises in this way has put customers, staff and the wider public at increased risk of infection when the majority of people are playing by the rules in an effort to bring infection rates down.
We also served similar notices on two hand car-washes in Weston last month. Officers have advised the vape shop operators that they can use click and collect and still trade within the regulations.

 

In other news… 

  • The managing director of a Worle butchers has been given a suspended prison sentence for breaching health and safety. 

  • North Somerset Council has welcomed the announcement of £2.227m funding from the government’s Pothole Fund. 

  • New orders to help tackle anti-social behaviour and make public spaces in North Somerset more welcoming have been approved. 

Tyntesfield Medical Group

Only a small handful of patients have been vaccinated in the past week using the small number of vials we deliberately held back from last weeks clinics specifically for those over 70s who had been previously uncontactable and who we’d expected to respond to letters sent to them. Additionally we have vaccinated patients undergoing chemo where the vaccination had to be timed accordingly between sessions.

A reminder that it has been well publicised in the media that GP practices are not prioritising cohort 5, the over 65s, and you should be booking into a mass vaccination centre via the internet or by calling NHS 119 for your first dose.

According to our records there are only 400 of you left to be vaccinated; it is probably less than that as there is a lag in records transferring to us.

The same applies for any NHS or Social Care workers still waiting their first dose vaccination, the mass vaccination centres are now your route to vaccination.

This is the link that leads you to the booking page online for the mass vaccination centres

https://www.nhs.uk/.../coro.../book-coronavirus-vaccination/

Anyone who we have given a first dose of vaccine to, regardless of the cohort you belong to, you have already been or will be inviting back for your second dose with us so don’t worry. If you had a first dose at a mass vaccination centre that is where you go for your second dose.

Also in this past week it was announced that further people were being added to the Clinically Extremely Vulnerable (shielding) list and were to receive letters from the Government advising them to shield. The criteria they have used to identify these additional people is complex and not yet readily searchable by our database. Prior to those letters going out we were confident we’d already offered a first vaccination to every patient on the shielding list. If you have received such a letter recently and have not yet received a first dose vaccination then you should be prioritised for one and should contact the mass vaccination centre. If that fails for you then get in contact with us with a copy of your letter to hand and we will prioritise you for the next available appointments we have.

 

We are now concentrating on Cohort 6 see https://www.gov.uk/.../joint-committee-on-vaccination-and...

Cohort 6 - Persons with underlying health conditions

There is good evidence that certain underlying health conditions increase the risk of morbidity and mortality from COVID-19. When compared to persons without underlying health conditions, the absolute increased risk in those with underlying health conditions is considered generally to be lower than the increased risk in persons over the age of 65 years (with the exception of the clinically extremely vulnerable). The committee’s (JCVI) advice is to offer vaccination to those aged 65 years and over followed by those in clinical risk groups aged 16 years and over. The main risk groups identified by the committee are set out below:

• chronic respiratory disease, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), cystic fibrosis and severe asthma

• chronic heart disease (and vascular disease)

• chronic kidney disease

• chronic liver disease

• chronic neurological disease including epilepsy

• Down’s syndrome

• severe and profound learning disability

• diabetes

• solid organ, bone marrow and stem cell transplant recipients

• people with specific cancers

• immunosuppression due to disease or treatment

• asplenia and splenic dysfunction

• morbid obesity

• severe mental illness

 

Other groups at higher risk, including those who are in receipt of a carer’s allowance, or those who are the main carer of an elderly or disabled person whose welfare may be at risk if the carer falls ill, should also be offered vaccination alongside these groups.

This has proven to be a particularly challenging category of patients to identify as there are strands of guidance which, for example, distinguishes asthma from serious asthma. Such detailed information cannot be extracted from a national database like age can be and that is a principle which has underpinned why over 65s are invited to a mass vaccination centre and GP practices have the difficult job of locating patients with the above conditions.

With over 32,000 registered patients it is not an easy task for us. It cannot be done manually with any efficiency and we have to rely upon IT searches been created and run by the technically skilled to locate the correct information and extract the right patients for us to invite for vaccination. That hasn’t gone as smoothly as we or any other GP practice would have liked.

In simple terms medical records systems work like this. Your clinician inputs text about your consultations and diagnosis. Medical conditions you have are then assigned a code to make them easily searchable, the medication you are taking can be searched for, when you last consulted for a specific issue can be searched for etc. Therefore to identify if a patient falls into one of the above categories, in accordance with guidance which has been issued a search has to be made against multiple, different criteria. I have already mentioned asthma which is a coded condition but then there are sub search which has to be done looking at medication, frequency of consultation and other factors to reach a valid conclusion whether or not it fits the criteria of severe asthma or asthma which falls outside of the criteria. I just use asthma as an example as it is the condition in the above list which most of us know a little bit about.

In the past week the search tools we have been supplied with have been refined 3 times. If you follow the discussion threads on our Facebook page you will see that in the past week some people who we have offered appointments to as ‘Cohort 6’ are saying “I don’t fit that criteria”. Actually when records are checked it is invariably the case they didn’t realise they fitted the condition basis of the criteria. In only a very small number of cases has it been found the coding was wrong. What has been identified though is that the earliest search tools we used were more liberal in identifying, for example, asthma cases by including some which fell short of the severe categorisation.

To put all of that into perspective. When we ran the first search tool v.1 we had available at the end of last week it identified close on 3600 patients in cohort 6. We started sending out invites for appointments and by Monday last we’d filled around 1000 appointments. Since then we have run v.2 and v.3 of the same search tool and on version 3 release it identifies nearer 3000 eligible patients in cohort 6. Each time a new version has been released we abandon the search list created with the last version and just used the newest version. Today we booked in the last of the 1500 appointment slots we had available for next week. We have just run the search tool again and it shows we have 1532 patient in that cohort left to book.

It is unlikely that the search tool is absolutely correct and it is still capable of flagging up patients to invite who are not strictly eligible yet but we have to live with it’s imperfections.

The important point to remember is that within 1 week we have given ½ of the eligible cohort 6 patients vaccination appointments next week therefore with a steady supply of vaccine we won’t take long getting you all vaccinated.

The message remains the same as always – be patient, we will get to you. We simply cannot invite everyone at once, we have to do it in blocks as we are informed of vaccine delivery dates.

For those of you who had the first dose Pfizer vaccine in December with us we will be in contact shortly as we are expecting confirmation of delivery of your second doses in March. Don’t contact us, as soon as we have a date we will be in contact with you. For those of you who had the Astra Zenec (Oxford) earlier this year don’t forget you have already been given your second dose appointment dates so keep them in your diary.

FOOTPATH CLOSE: It is good to see North Somerset Council has temporarily closed the footpath leading from Nailsea High Street to the alley alongside the Royal Oak pub because of the dangerous stonewall...scroll down for original story...

People speak - public consultations

Plans for the future of development in North Somerset have taken an important step forward with the publication of the council’s response to the latest round of consultation.
North Somerset Council is in the process of developing a new Local Plan for the area. 
People told the council they didn't want houses built in flood plains and favoured using brown field land.
The report says: "The Urban Focus approach seeks to maximise as much growth as possible close to the largest urban centres of Weston-super-Mare, Clevedon, Nailsea, Portishead and Bristol where there are already a good range of services, facilities and jobs. This approach had the most overall support out of all the proposed approaches. 569 respondents strongly supported this approach and 391 respondents supported the approach. This means that 64 per cent overall though this was the best approach as to where to locate new development."
The issue of transport and impact on the road network was frequently citied as a concern both in and out of towns and on the villages, such as Tickenham located near to the towns and urban areas.
Tickenham Road Action Group is actively campaigning to stop any more commuter traffic thundering through its village. Its annual meeting is at 7pm on Tuesday, March 9, by video conference on Skype. To join email Bruce Campbell at info@trag.org.uk.
Once adopted, the plan will identify where development can and cannot take place in North Somerset as well as which supporting services and infrastructure are required.
More than 1,600 people took part in the six-week Choices consultation, which focused on the possible approaches to the location of future development in North Somerset.
Four approaches were put forward for discussion and people were asked what they liked or disliked about each, or whether there are any alternative ways of distributing the proposed growth. 
North Somerset Council executive member for planning, highways and transport James Tonkin is the independent ward councillor for Nailsea West End.
He said: “The responses to the Choices consultation have been so useful in helping the council understand local people’s priorities for development in North Somerset, so thank you to everyone who took the time to have their say.
“The government’s housing target for North Somerset is currently 20,475 new homes during the next 15 years. 
"Without a Local Plan we could end up with unplanned growth in the wrong places, with no supporting facilities.
“The final agreed approach is likely to be a combination of the various different options. 
"We are determined to produce a Local Plan which provides high quality places, in sustainable locations, with all the facilities communities need to flourish.”
The results of the Choices consultation will be used as a starting point for developing a draft Local Plan, which will be consulted on this autumn. 
To view the results go to www.n-somerset.gov.uk/newlocalplan.

North Somerset Council wants to introduce safe cycle and walking routes around the district.

For Backwell and Nailsea it includes introducing a network of rural lanes of cycle and pedestrian routes across the moors linking to Clevedon and Yatton.

The proposed routes will maintain any essential or farm access.

But first the council it wants to know what the public think.

Residents, businesses and visitors are encouraged to have their say on the proposed changes, which will include:

  • Clevedon – 20mph speed limit and public realm improvements in Hill Road and The Beach, introducing a one-way system to allow wider pavements and segregated cycle facilities;

  • Weston super Mare - creating a cycling corridor on Baker Street and Milton Road, with a 20mph limit, one-way eastwards and a segregated cycling route over Hildesheim Bridge to the town centre;

  • Yatton, Clevedon and Nailsea - establishing a rural lanes network of cycle and pedestrian routes between Backwell, Clevedon, Nailsea and Yatton, while maintaining essential and farm accesses; and

  • Several school schemes that offer safe cycling and walking routes to school for children and parents.

North Somerset Council executive member for planning, highways and transport James Tonkin is the independent ward councillor for Nailsea West End.

He said: “Covid-19 has changed the way we live our lives.

“Outdoor activities have increased significantly, including walking and cycling, and we need to react accordingly.

“The suggested changes will allow visitors, residents and businesses the opportunity to continue enjoying North Somerset towns, but in a safe and secure manner.

“However, these are suggestions and we want to hear from the people of North Somerset so we can effectively meet the needs and wants of the community.”

The first schemes up for public consultation will be Clevedon between February and March.

To register your comments as part of the consultation, go to https://www.n-somerset.gov.uk/activetravel

North Somerset towns have been awarded £473,750 from the Government to introduce permanent routes for walking and cycling and socially distanced environments.

The funding is part of a national £175m grant from the Department for Transport (DfT), which will see new safe routes for people to walk and cycle safely built rapidly within the next year.

New arts centre for Nailsea

Nailsea Town Council has ‘great expectations’ for future years but faces a budget crisis during the next fiscal year.

Millions of pounds will come into its coffers from the sale of land for housing at Engine Lane and monies from the Taylor Wimpey phased development at Netherton Grange leaving big decisions ahead for councillors.

Even the building company has posted online: “We believe our proposals will carry wider benefits to the community beyond the provision of new homes.

“These benefits will include a number of financial contributions that will be made towards the local community as part of our proposed development, in agreement with the relevant local authorities. 

“These will be in the form of a Section 106 Agreement and Community Infrastructure Levy (CIL).

“Further details of these contributions will be released once finalised with the council.”

But what to spend the money on? This "new money' would represent a more than 10-fold increase in its usual half a million annual budget.

In a newspaper poll dated 1986 Nailsea people voted as their top priority for a hospital in the town!

They also put a new sports centre next and then a swimming pool.

But priorities change and in 2021 what would the people of Nailsea chose?

Zooming into Nailsea Town Council meeting on Wednesday, February 10, you learn a lot about the personalities and politics at parish level.

While you see on the screen polite smiles there was a tangible tension as former councillor and founder of Nailsea Community Group James Steel asked lots of searching questions about budgets past and present.

It stood to current finance chairman Ben Kushner to respond to accusations of the council not hitting budget for many years and escalating staff costs while cutting community grants.

An increase of £5.11 per household would be sufficient to balance the books, the meeting learned.

Adding to the property portfolio which already includes the Tithe Barn and 65 High Street seems a sound investment and the obviously choice but with that comes maintenance and running costs.

New councillor Emily Miller kick-started the discussion with a detailed PowerPoint presentation exploring the possibilities and information on further funding avenues.

You can read it HERE.

One suggestion was making Grove Sports & Social Centre the sports hub for the town and taking over Scotch Horn Centre for arts and performance.

This was either by knocking down the buildings and starting again or enhancing and investing in what is already on offer.

Mrs Miller said: “…perhaps Scotch Horn might be the perfect solution as part of a bigger strategy.

“If Scotch Horn became the site for Nailsea Community Arts Space we could make The Grove a dedicated, state of the art, up to date sports complex, enclosing the current facilities at Scotch Horn.

“Both sites would benefit from investment and this could be a forward-thinking plan to protect and build upon the future of our leisure facilities.

“Alternatively, if NCAS was based at Scotch Horn we could include brand new leisure provision on site too.

“Scotch Horn is well situated with parking but also near good public transport and walking links.”

The idea for a swimming pools because of finding a site and huge running costs doesn’t seem to be in the equations, but a cinema with comfy seats, new home for the library, a museum and heritage trail are currently viable options.

To read the full official minutes of the town council meeting go to https://www.nailseatowncouncil.gov.uk/minutes-agendas/,

The next full council meeting is on Wednesday, March 24.

Latest coronavirus case data

306 new cases have been identified in North Somerset compared with 372 the previous week. 
Our case rate per 100,000 head of population has continued to decrease and is now 142.3 compared with a South West figure of 125.5 and an England rate of 194.6.
There is a lag in case data meaning the latest information is for the week ending Saturday 6 February.
You can see more detail on our local case data at www.n-somerset.gov.uk/lomp.
Case data is also available at national, regional, council and neighbourhood level at https://coronavirus.data.gov.uk/cases
Anyone who is unable to work from home can now get tested twice a week if they do not have symptoms of coronavirus.
The extra testing will help those in our community who need to continue to work away from home during lockdown - such as in shops, providing childcare, in homes, on sites, or on public transport - to keep themselves and their families safe by reducing the spread of Covid-19.
Testing is available at Scotch Horn Leisure Centre, Nailsea, Somerset Hall, Portishead, and Hutton Moor Leisure Centre, Weston.
All three sites operate seven days a week 8.30am-5pm, with evening opening until 7.30pm on Tuesdays and Thursdays.
Anyone living or working in North Somerset who does not have symptoms of Covid-19 can get tested at one of the three centres.
To find out more and book your test visit www.n-somerset.gov.uk/rapidtesting.

Anyone with symptoms of Covid-19 – new continuous cough, loss of or change in sense of taste or smell, or a high temperature – should self-

isolate and book a test at www.gov.uk/get-coronavirus-test or by calling 119.
You should book even if you have recent negative rapid test result.
This gives access to a symptomatic test, which can be carried out at Locking Road car park, Weston-super-Mare, or Castlewood, Clevedon.
Locking Road is open 8am-8pm seven days a week can be used by people arriving for their appointment on foot as well as by car, known as a walk-through site.

Free parking is available for those being tested.
A mobile testing unit (MTU) runs from Castlewood in Clevedon but can only accept appointments by car.

Culprit admits fly-tipping in rural North Somerset  

The man responsible for fly-tipping in Long Ashton countryside has been ordered to pay fines and costs totalling £1,133 following a successful prosecution by North Somerset Council. 

Lee Stuart Docherty, of Allerton Road, Bristol, entered a guilty plea at Bristol Magistrates Court this month after being prosecuted by the council for fly-tipping waste on Yanley Lane in Long Ashton.

He was given a £480 fine, a victim surcharge of £48 and was ordered to pay costs of £605.

The fly-tipped waste consisted of cardboard, children’s toys, an umbrella, plastic boxes, lawnmower parts and black bags containing waste.

The offence was recorded and, having obtained the vehicle registration number of the vehicle used, officers found that Mr Docherty was the registered keeper at the time the offence took place.

Mr Docherty was invited to attend a voluntary interview under caution to answer questions relating to this offence. He did not attend the interview.

Welcoming the outcome of the prosecution, Backwell ward councillor Bridget Petty who is North Somerset's executive member for waste and recycling, said: “Fly-tipping has such a negative impact on our local environment and communities.

“We will investigate all incidents of fly-tipping and issue fixed penalty notices or, as in this case, prosecute individuals when sufficient evidence is found.

"The message is clear - fly-tipping is completely unacceptable and will not be tolerated in North Somerset."

Household waste can be disposed of at any of the council recycling centres at Backwell, Portishead and Weston-super-Mare.

Residents who find fly-tipped waste are encouraged to report it online to the council as soon as possible at www.n-somerset.gov.uk/flytipping.

You can follow these simple steps to make sure your waste is disposed of legally:

  • S - Suspect all waste carriers. Don't let them take your waste until they have proven themselves to be legitimate. A professional waste carrier should happily answer reasonable questions.

  • C - Check that a waste carrier is registered on the Environment Agency's website.

  • R - Refuse any unexpected offers to have your rubbish taken away.

  • A - Ask what will happen to your rubbish and seek evidence that it is going to be disposed of appropriately.

  • P - Paperwork must be obtained - a proper invoice, waste transfer note or receipt, including a description of the waste being removed and the waste carrier’s contact details.

Rapid Covid-19 testing at NOT High Street, Nailsea

Longer opening hours and an additional site have been announced for North Somerset’s coronavirus rapid testing service

 

Nailsea Town Council health hub at 65 High Street is to become a coronvirus rapid teasting centre from this month.

Nailsea joins Somerset Hall, Portishead, and Hutton Moor Leisure Centre, Weston, which both opened last month.

The new centre will be open from Tuesday, February 9.

All three sites will also see extended hours, operating seven days a week 8.30am-5pm, with evening opening until 7.30pm on Tuesdays and Thursdays.

Anyone unable to work from home who does not have symptoms of Covid-19 can get tested weekly at one of the three centres.

North Somerset Council executive member for health Mike Bell is the Liberal Democrat councillor for Weston-super-Mare Central.

He said: “With our community rapid testing currently supporting people who cannot work from home during lockdown, we have extended the opening hours to give more opportunities for people to get tested outside the standard 9am-5pm.

“The centres were already open seven days a week, but the daily earlier start time and later closing times twice a week should help people fit the tests into their individual schedules.

“The extra site at Nailsea will also make it easier for people living in this area to get their regular tests.”

Rapid testing, which takes around five minutes to do and gives results in under an hour, helps find people who are infectious with Covid-19 but do not have symptoms.

This allows them to isolate, taking the virus out of the community and stopping the spread.

Anyone who lives or works in North Somerset can get tested, with critical workers and volunteers who cannot work from home during lockdown encouraged to get tested at least once a week.

North Somerset Council director of public health Matt Lenny, said: “Alongside restrictions and vaccinations, testing is another important element in our continuing fight against coronavirus.

“It can be a very worrying time if you are unable to work from home, when we are being asked to stay there as much as possible, so getting yourself tested will help you know you are doing all you can to protect yourself and your family from the infection.”

As a negative test is only as good as the moment it is taken, it cannot be used as a reason to avoid following Covid safety guidelines."It is vital those who test negative continue to wash their hands, wear a face covering if they can, keep at least 2m away from anyone not in their household or social bubble, and follow lockdown rules.

​North Somerset rapid testing is for people aged 16 and over.

For more information and to book at all centres visit   

www.n-somerset.gov.uk/rapidtesting.

  • UPDATE 2: 4pm Monday, February 2, North Somerset Council say: "We will be opening the testing site at Scotch Horn Centre in Nailsea. We've got a few logistical details to finalise and once we've done that we'll send an update round to our press release to confirm if it will open Wednesday afternoon or Thursday morning."

  • UPDATE 1: 65 High Street NOT suitable for Covid-19 testing - council having rethink!

Nailsea police newsletter

Nailsea neighbourhood police have published their latest newsletter.

It is more about community liaison than latest crime figures which can be accessed at https://www.police.uk/ and typing in your postal code or Nailsea.

Nailsea crime figures are traditionally below the national averages with approximately 50 crimes reported monthly.

But in December 2020 the latest month figures are available it dropped significantly. 

Our local police have a new Facebook page at:

Portishead, Clevedon and Nailsea Neighbourhood Policing please note NOT for reporting crime.

 

Thankfully Covid cases have been dropping but police have been busy monitoring social gatherings which break the rules.

Because of Covid-19 restrictions the front desk at Nailsea Police Station, Pound Lane, Nailsea BS48 2NN is still closed but for non-emergencies call 101 and for emergencies call 999.
The Crimestoppers number is 0800 555 111.

According to the newsletter our police officers liked the amusing comments posted on Nailsea People Facebook page about the rectangle of dirt dug at Millennium Park in January.

The ideas ranged from a mini police hub to a bus stop to a helicopter landing pad.

To see an excellent demonstration on the ping pong table download the January newsletter HERE.

BRING YOUR OWN BAT: The ping pong table has arrived at Millennium Park, Nailsea. Ping! is bring ping pong to the park. Costing £1,500 Nailsea Town Council environment and leisure committee agreed to contribute £500 towards the vandal-proof concrete outdoor table which will have a 9mm resin laminate, exceptionally durable, weatherproof playing surface on a galvanised steel frame. This is shock, fire, and graffiti resistant. The ping pong parlour at Crown Glass Shopping Centre was closed last summer due to ‘vandalism’. The neighbourhood police team hope to establish a hub in the park near to the Scotch Horn Centre, skatepark and ping pong table. The construction led to much conjecture on the Nailsea People Facebook page and we still need to sort a prize(s) for the best suggestion(s) which in these difficult times made a humorous read.

Red letter day (not)

Red letter day on Queens Road - Nailsea is happy to have a Banksy or two but not this uninspiring graffitti or perhaps you think differently?
This post on Nailsea People Facebook page reached 5,000 and attracted nearly 50 comments.
Here are a selection:
Pam Leggate said: "I noticed that the other day - not good."
Mark Ashman said: "That looks like the same handwriting as the graffiti on my pub, we need to catch the culprit."
Nicola Bielby said: "Looks dreadful.:
Claire Watkins said: "And the work of a COVID denier, tin foil hat loon as well."
But Jayne Mitchell said; "Surely someone who disagrees with lockdown and the civil rights and freedoms that have been lost. That does not equate to a denial of the existence of Covid. I don’t, of course, condone the destruction of other peoples’ property."
Doris The Diva said: "Every village has got one."
Mike Davies said: "Banksy was probably a crap artist once too. Everyone needs to start somewhere - if they don't get caught first."
George Burgess said: "That's why the country is in the state it is due to clowns like this people need to open there eyes and believe its real belive me the lads who deliver the PPI around the wards have had the marines helping them as there run off there feet."
Bev Milner-Simonds said: "I’m over the moon to spot a unicorn!"
Sophie Jones said: "Same hand writing as the graffiti outside ours on Coombe Road plus we have a very inappropriate drawing of what I tell my six-year-old is a ‘snake’."
Pamela Burt said: "Interesting isn’t it, that quite often, the same people who break the COVID rules on the grounds that they are standing up for their “freedom” are the same ones complaining about the government when they or their family end up in hospital, and are at the same time making things worse for the rest of us who ARE obeying the rules. Rights also go with responsibilities."
Mick Graham said: "Took me four days to scrub and pressure wash similar rubbish off my garden wall. Talentless little vandals."

BAGGING AREA: 1st Nailsea Scouts posted on Facebook for recycycled clothes in a bid to raise much needed funds. And after several sessions items for the Bags2School fundraiser piled up at its Clevedon Road headquarters. Organiser Bridget Wyatt said: "Please can I say a huge thanks to everyone who has donated. We have had an immense response." There was a strict criteria about bagged items but the number donated was amazing. Bridget added: "Wow! Nailsea, you are amazing, Bags2School collected our recycling on Monday morning. It took two vans and they said it was the biggest collection they have ever done. We have raised £900 towards the costs of keeping 1st Nailsea Scout Group going this year. Thank you everyone who took the time to donate, we really appreciate it."

See What's On page for details of another collection

STONEWALL(ED): The old stone wall in the alley between the Royal Oak public house leading to Break charity shop and The Original Factory Shop has collapsed - take care walking along especially in the dark. It acts as a shortcut to Scotch Horn Centre from the High Street. Thanks to Lauren Bowers and Steve Lewis for the photos. Not sure owns the boundary wall.

UPDATE: Sunday morning, January 24, Nailsea People had a quick look and the footpath is still blocked. The stonewall which has fallen down seems to abutt a piece of ‘no-man’s land’ and will pose a danger to walkers using the alley especially at nighttime. We don’t know if it has been anyone reported to anyone? The community police think it is an issue for the council…at the very least it needs some red and white tape…

UPDATE:  North Somerset councillors Andy Cole and James Tonkin carried out an inspection with a council official. It has been established the wall is the responsibility of the owner who lives in the Scilly Isles. A report on the state of the walls and if they pose a danger to the public is being prepared. In the meantime Andy arranged for the A-board blocking access.

More car break-ins in Nailsea

Nailsea People has received more reports of car break-ins.
Rachel Morgan said: "Just a warning, my car was broken into on Wednesday/Thursday  night at Mizzymead Road.
"The passenger door was left a jar, they had a good rout through everything, but I don't leave anything in there.
"I think it was approximately 11pm on Wednesday, as I heard a noise but thought I was dreaming.
Sami Gifford said: "Same as my car. 
"I got told doors were ajar so checked and all they could get was Now That's Music CD and open wire panel.
Rachel said all she had inside her car was empty crisp packets!
Sami added: "It's horrible, my neighbours were done a week or so before and garages broken into. 
"Not happy at all."
Rachel added: "You would think things are crap enough without this happening to everyone."
Andy Pratt said "I've just installed security cameras on

our house as its happening all to often at the moment."

But Rachel had CCTV on the garage and van but had parked her car on the other side of the road.
Alice Yarr said: "Mine was broken into as well, nothing taken as nothing in there to take, obviously doing the rounds."

Dog poisoned by discarded drugs

A Nailsea dog walker discovered packets of drugs and nitrous oxide canisters in Hanham Way on Saturday night but not before her puppy swallowed one of the packets.

Gill Ryan said: “My five month old puppy collapsed after swallowing one of these packets.”

It is hopeful the young dog will make a full recovery but the cost of emergency treatment from a vet is expected to be run into several hundred pounds. 

Gill is warning all dog walkers to be vigilant saying ‘there are no words to describe the person who dropped the drugs’.

The NOS canisters and drug packets pictured were recovered from the grassy area next to pavement near the roadworks.

Gill added: "My puppy is recovering well as the drug ingested is a sedative in white powder form, possibly ketamine."

Kayla Caddoo-Frost commented on Nailsea People Facebook page where more than 8,000 read about the incident in the first few hours is was posted.

Kayla said: "The poor pup but it is not just animals what about small children, why do illegal drug dealers have to put pictures on the bags (see photo of drug bags decorated with dolphins)?"

A police spokesman said the neighhood team will be stepping up foot patrols in the area this week and reminded the public if they see anything suspicious to call 101 or contact Crimestoppers on 0800 555 111.

Beau(tiful) update

on poisoned puppy

Dog owner Gill Ryan is letting everyone know that her five-month-old Golden Retriever puppy is fully recovered after digesting drugs picked up at Hanham Way, Nailsea, on Saturday evening.

Emergency treatment by vets Watkins & Tasker saved the day and after a scary night administering liquid charcoal (and clearing up the sicky mess) Beau is happy and healthy once again.

This news reached more than 10,000 on the Nailsea People Facebook page with hundreds of 'likes/loves' and many comments including:

  • Sarah Jefferies who said: "Amazing news.'

  • Sue Lane said: "Oh I’m so please. Thank you for the update. Sending all my love."

  • Amber Walters said: "So glad the pup has made a fully recovery! Hope who ever left those dirty packets laying around has seen this and feels very guilty and ashamed of themselves."

  • Jeanne Parkinson said: "So pleased your pup is fully recovered."

  • Cathy Blakemore said: "Great to hear Beau has recovered You must have had a fretful night."

  • Anne Ray-Rowley said: "Oh that's great news I'm soo glad Beau's okay."

  • Charlotte Smith said: "So glad your beautiful puppy is recovering well."

  • Lee Lynas said: "So glad."

  • Mike Davies said: "Cute pup."

HMD remembered with prayers and planting

International Holocaust Remembrance Day on Wednesday, January 27 was commemorated worldwide including a special service in Nailsea.

Because of Covid-19 rules the socially distanced service on Lions Green was led by Nailsea Town Council chairman Jan Barber with prayers said by councillor Ben Kusher.

On January 27, 1945 Allied troops liberated the Auschwitz-Birkenau extermination camp in Nazi occupied Poland and the date has now become Holocaust Memorial Day in the UK and across the World

On HMD Nailsea Town Council planted an oak tree, in remembrance of the six million Jews and several million others who were murdered during the Nazi holocaust.

When Auschwitz was liberated, some of the survivors held signs saying, ‘never again’.

However, tragically, the world has witnessed further genocides in Rwanda, Cambodia, Bosnia and Darfur.

Mrs Barber said: “Before I hand over to Cllr Ben Kushner to say a prayer in Hebrew and some points about today, I should like to refer to a couple of things that have happened to me over the years in connection with this.

“Firstly, on visiting Prague, not only did I visit the Jewish Museum but also underwent a trip to Bubny Railway Station, outside Prague. 

“The Holocaust Monument is called the Gate of Infinity and is an expanse of railway track extending towards the heavens – simple but so thought-provoking. 

“From the station many Czech Jews boarded trains on their way to death camps, I was very moved by this and how the spirit of all those people can still be in our thoughts and hearts. 

“This tree we have planted is so poignant an image because it represents Life, Learning and Renewal.

“I find it difficult enough to envisage that six million died due to the Holocaust and Whitwell Middle School, in Tennessee, were determined to show their pupils how many that was. 

“They decided to do it with paper clips. 

“Twenty years later the Paper Clip Project is still going.

“At the school there is the Children’s Paperclip Holocaust Memorial as one and a half million of the six million who died were children. 

“Horrifying. 

“Paperclips were chosen as they were worn by Norwegians as a symbol of resistance against the Nazis during the Second World War. 

“I always carry a paper clip in my purse so that I never forget how many people were affected by this atrocity.”

Mr Kushner said: “Nailsea Town Council is planting this tree today to commemorate those who perished in these genocides, with our utmost hope that we should never again witness any more such atrocities, which represent such a terrible stain on the history of man-kind.“We hope this tree represents life, freedom and hope, for the millions of oppressed people in the world today.”

The Kaddish

Yitgadal v’yitkadash shmay raba, bu-alma divra chur-utai,

Ve-eyamlich malchutai, be-shaya-chon, uv yom-achon uv chayai de chol beit Yisrael, ba-agala uviz man kariv.

Ve’imru amain!

Ye-hei sh-mei raba mav-arach le alam ul almay al-maya

Yitbarach, ve yishta bach, ve yit pa- ar, veyit romam

Veyit nasei, veyit hadar, veyit alay, veyit halal shmai kud-sha. Berich hu leila min kol bir-chata, ve shirata, tuchbu chata, ve nech mata, da- am’iran bu-alma.

Ve’imru amein!

Yehay sh’lama raba min sh’maya ve’chayim aleinu v’al

col yisrael

Ve’imru amain!

Oseh shalom bim’romav, hu ya-aseh shalom aleinu v’al

col Yisrael. Ve’imru, amein!

Council to remember

Nailsea Town Council environment and leisure committee chaired by Jonathan Argles discussed memorials at its Zoom meeting on Wednesday, January 13.

There was a discussion about a suitable memorial for former councillor Phil Barclay, who was in his nineties when died in December.

This should acknowledge all his work on mapping public footpaths and conservation, it was decided.

Naming a road after him and/or a tree were among the ideas favoured.

An oak tree is also to be planted at Lions Green to commemorate Holocaust Memorial Day on Wednesday, January 27.

The theme for HMD 2021 is Be The Light In The Darkness which has taken on a new and more poignant meaning during the coronavirus pandemic. Councillor Ben Kushner will read a Hebrew prayer and the event will be filmed and shared.

Council chairman Jan Barber said: "The tree will be a 12ft oak and replaces the tree which was damaged after a storm."

There was talk of establishing community gardens on many of the green open spaces dotted around the town including those on housing estates along with shared compost bins - but only if neighbours agreed.

The communal areas could be more than cabbage patches but used to grow fruit trees and the harvest shared with the community larder established by Nailsea Community Group.

However, there was some concern voiced about the number of ‘twigs’ planted at Blackthorn Way which has completed covered the area and whether the maintenance of the saplings was adequate.

Councillor Joanne Hopkinson said mulch had been put down this week and clerk Jo Duffy said this was on the agenda for discussion with North Somerset officers later this month.

This meeting has been arranged to discuss several items of concern to Nailsea councillors including 'dangerous' pot holes on The Drove. 

The re-wilding spearheaded by the district council has resulted in a forest rather than a coppice being planted at Nailsea Park, said town council chairman Jan Barber.

She told the committee she had received several complaints about what had happened to the land which people are now unable to walk across.

There is a mineshaft from Nailsea's coalmining era in the middle of the space hidden by hedgerows.

The committee was told Nailsea Junior Football Club has made an approach to Nailsea Playing Fields Association to join Nailsea United FC and Nailsea Cricket Club by making the Grove sports field its home ground.

The sports field is owned by the town council and leased for 31 more years to the NPFA.

No matches have been played since December, said NPFA representative Maureen Brady.

New councillor Emily Miller is to progress ideas to make the skate park more accessible for all ages in consultation with Phil Williams who was the driving force behind the facility being built in the town.

The Millennium Park amenity is currently closed on police advice due to the Covid-19 social distancing rules although some young people have flagrantly ignored the closure, the meeting heard.

POLICE NEWS: Nailsea neighbourhood police have sent out a newsletter with a new year message for all – see photo. There is a new Facebook page for the officers which includes Portishead and Nailsea at:

https://www.facebook.com/Portishead-Clevedon-and-Nailsea-Neighbourhood-Policing-100814498548256/

The majority of police front offices are closed in a bid to reduce the spread of coronavirus. This includes Nailsea. Only four front desks remain open seven days a week at:

• The Bridewell Police Station, Bristol

• Patchway Police Centre, South Gloucestershire

• Bridgwater Police Centre, Somerset

• Yeovil Police Station, Somerset

FROZEN 3: The weather forecast predicted snow but here in Nailsea all we got was a bitter wind which was enough to freeze the ice on the duck pond at The Elms, Wraxall. However, this clever hen led the way by breaking the ice with her beak and swimmomg to open water followed by two mallards. She got the idea after watching a child using a stick who broke the ice at the pond edge 

Bowie birthday broadcast

Nailsea screenwriter Ashley Pharaoh made a guest appeared on Radio 4 on Saturday morning to talk about David Bowie.

The programme was in honour the day before of what would have been the Ziggy Stardust legend's 73rd birthday on January 8.

Ashley, aged 61, who is also a television producer was born in Southampton but grew up in Nailsea.

North Somerset gets a mention on the programme as Ashley recalls his teenaged years.

Ashely is best known as the co-creator/writer of the successful drama series Life on Mars, which began on BBC One in 2006, and creator/writer of the family drama Wild at Heart, which aired on ITV1 from 2006 until 2012.

A former pupil at QEH he went on to study at the University of Sussex and the National Film and Television School in Beaconsfield in the 1980s.

His graduation film Water's Edge was nominated for a BAFTA which is said to have featured Nailsea characters and he still has local family including his dad Freddy, aged 90, living in the town.

Ashley wrote many EastEnders scripts and an episode of District Nurses starring Pam Ferris and Sarah Lancashire about a Yorkshire community in which he uses his experience of his late mother Margaret’s cancer treatment.

Ashley credited the late great singer as the inspiration for Life on Mars series and on the programme musicians and fans talk about the wistful beauty and the philosophical intent of David Bowie's classic song.

Ashely said on air: “The lyrics ‘See the mice in their million hordes, From Ibiza to the Norfolk Broads, Rule Britannia is out of bounds, where does that come from?

“The song was a massive part of the television series.”

TUNE IN: If you missed the programme you can hear it here https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m000r33c.

Break-in Nailsea

Police made house-to-house inquires after a house in The Perrings area of Nailsea was broken into overnight Friday/Saturday, January 8-9.

Nothing is believed to have been taken but the culprits fled in a hurry leaving the conservatory doors wide open after making a search for items to steal.

Police asked all householders to step up their home security.

Nailsea People Facebook comments include reports of a similar incident at Hillcrest Road and the contents of a parked unlocked car taken.

PHOTO: For illustrative purposes only

North Somerset Covid-19 news

This is the latest updates issued by North Somerset Council.

As case rates continue to rise in North Somerset we know that the coming weeks are going to be extremely difficult, especially for our health services which are already under pressure.

The most important thing we can all do to help our NHS, and protect our community, is to respect the lockdown rules. We should all stay at home as much as we can, wash our hands regularly, wear a face covering if we can, and always stay at least 2 metres from anyone not in our household or support bubble.

Working together we can look after each other and bring our rates down.

LATEST CASE DATA

Our weekly seven-day rate for North Somerset (based on a full week’s data) shows the North Somerset rate is 372.0 per 100,000 head of population. This is an increase on the rate with shared with you on Wednesday of 360.4. This compares to the South West seven-day rate of 344.1 and the rate for England at 612.1.

There is a lag in case data meaning the latest information is for the week ending Saturday 2 January. 800 new cases were identified in that week.

These rates are the highest we have seen in North Somerset since the pandemic began.

You can see more detail on our local case data at www.n-somerset.gov.uk/lomp.

Case data is also available at national, regional, council and neighbourhood level at https://coronavirus.data.gov.uk/cases

 

NORTH SOMERSET RAPID TESTING

North Somerset Council will use government funding for community testing to extend the successful pilot, which launched in Weston College last month.

Our public health team is finalising the details of this service and we expect to be able to start offering tests to our residents in the next couple of weeks. We will release more details, including where the testing sites will be, who can benefit most from a test and how to book, as soon as it is available.

The testing, which is known a lateral flow, is for people who do not have symptoms of Covid-19, so are asymptomatic. Anyone with symptoms - a new continuous cough, loss of or change in sense of taste or smell, or a high temperature – should continue to book their test at  www.gov.uk/get-coronavirus-test or by calling 119. This testing is free and available now.

 

MOBILE TESTING UNITS

For anyone who has symptoms of coronavirus the mobile testing units (MTU) are operating at Locking Road car park, Weston-super-Mare, and Castlewood in Clevedon until at least Sunday, January 24.

The Department for Health and Social Care (government) decides where to have mobile testing units and when they will be open. There has been a mechanical issue with the vehicle that serves the Clevedon MTU this week, so that site is currently being served via a reserve unit. This may affect availability of the Clevedon site over the coming days but should that be the case we will provide a further update when DHSC inform us.

You can book a free test online at www.gov.uk/get-coronavirus-test or by calling 119. If you have symptoms, book a test.

 

NORTH SOMERSET TOGETHER

Thank you to all the North Somerset Together volunteers who have responded so quickly to this third national lockdown. Our network partners have confirmed that they are ready to respond to new requests for support, giving us coverage across all towns and the larger parishes in North Somerset.

We currently have enough volunteer capacity and, in some cases, have already had new volunteers come forward. Given the increasing level of infections we will keep this under review as the lockdown proceeds.

More specialised support continues to be available via North Somerset Together from partners including Voluntary Action North Somerset (VANS), Citizen’s Advice North Somerset, Curo and Alliance Homes.

Anyone who is classed as clinically extremely vulnerable (CEV) has been asked to shield during this lockdown, staying home as much as possible. As well as the support you can get from North Somerset Together, if you are CEV you can also register with the National Shielding Support Service (NSSS), which will give you access to priority supermarket deliveries. If you have already registered with the service, you do not need to do so again.

Anyone aged over 70 who registers with the NSSS and indicates that they need additional support will also be referred to North Somerset Council’s Wellness Service, which offers telephone welfare checks for people who are self-isolating, for an assessment.

Our community meals service is on standby to help the network with emergency food requests if needed.

Government communications to Clinically Extremely Vulnerable are arriving, and we will follow up North Somerset Together information later next week to give a second prompt to people to register with NSSS or contact their local network if needed.

The network has also been supporting the vaccination programme by helping eligible residents get to their appointments. We will continue to work with the NHS in the coming weeks as the rollout continues.

 

NEWS FROM OUR HEALTH PARTNERS

From BNSSG - Ashton Gate announced as Vaccination Centre

The Government has confirmed Ashton Gate Stadium in Bristol as one of seven 'super vaccination centres' across England, and the first in the South West.

This is another significant step forward for our local vaccination programme. The increased capacity at Ashton Gate should allow us to continue to move through the prioritisation categories at pace, and vaccinations at the stadium will start next week.

As a system, our shared priority is a safe and effective roll-out for everyone in Bristol, North Somerset and South Gloucestershire. Our local Primary Care Networks (PCNs) began vaccinating the over 80s and care home residents in December, and by the end of next week all 19 PCN sites in BNSSG will be up and running. The UHBW hub also became operational this week, doubling our hospital hub capacity.

A huge thanks go to the health and care staff in every setting who have pulled out all the stops and worked so hard on the roll-out to date. We know is hasn’t been easy and the programme team would like to thank everyone for their resilience and perseverance.

While this strengthens our capacity to vaccinate at scale, it will still take time to reach everyone. Please be reassured that there is enough vaccine to go around and people will be invited by the NHS to receive their vaccination as soon as it is their turn.

We are working through the next steps for frontline staff vaccination at the moment and will be sharing more on this soon.

You can find all the latest updates on the local roll-out at the Healthier Together webpage:  COVID-19: Mass vaccination - Healthier Together

 

FROM UHBW - WESTON HOSPITAL

Dr William Oldfield, medical director at University Hospitals Bristol and Weston NHS Foundation Trust said: “Weston General Hospital continues to be under significant pressure, but we have taken appropriate action to maintain the safety of our patients and staff, and are working with our partners across health and social care to help to ease the pressure on the hospital.

“We would like to repeat that Weston General Hospital is open as normal and is not a COVID-only hospital. We assess and treat all patients on the grounds of clinical need and patient safety, and over the past few days we have admitted COVID-positive patients to Weston and admitted COVID-negative patients elsewhere to help ease pressures on Weston General Hospital. This is a temporary measure which is under regular review.

“We would like to provide assurance that the measures we have taken enable Weston General Hospital to continue to operate safely. We would encourage anyone who has an appointment to please attend as planned, and remind the wider public of the crucial importance of following the latest Government restrictions.”

ROLL OUT: Dr Jon Rees, of Brockway Medical Centre, posted this image on Instragram after a busy day on the frontline

FROM NIGHTINGALE HOSPITAL BRISTOL

We know that many of our hospitals in the Severn sub-region are extremely busy, as they are all over the country, with the rising numbers of people with Covid-19 and the usual winter illnesses. At present, we at the Nightingale Hospital Bristol remain in standby – ready to care with compassion when needed.

The Nightingale hospitals each play a different role in their local areas, while the Nightingale Hospitals in Manchester and Exeter are step-down facilities for patients with Covid-19, as your know, our hospital has been specifically designed to provide the highest level of specialist care for critically ill patients with Covid-19. The design of the unit directly affects its suitability for different types of clinical care for inpatients. While it is suitable for the delivery of outpatient services, in terms of inpatient clinical care our hospital is only suitable for inpatient intensive care.

We can assure you that we constantly review our position with our system partners and the regional team. We are the insurance policy for the region and as yet we are fortunate that in this region we have not reached the triggers for opening as a Covid-19 intensive care unit. If and when we do, we will, of course, let you know.

 

IT EQUIPMENT FOR ONLINE LEARNING

If someone in your community doesn’t have access to the internet at home or if their child doesn’t have a suitable device for online learning, please advise them to contact their school who may be able to help via the government’s national scheme.

 

HELP US SPREAD THE WORD

With case rates in North Somerset at their highest levels, we are redoubling our efforts to encourage our local communities to play their part and do everything they can to reduce the spread of infection. We will be adding regular updates to our website and social media feeds so that the local community can access the latest information available, and encouraging everyone to respect the lockdown measures. Please share these posts when you see them and help us reach more people. Your endorsement as community leaders will also help to encourage positive behaviours.

 

BUSINESS SUPPORT

 The chancellor has announced support for businesses including:

  • One-off top up grants for retail, hospitality and leisure businesses worth up to £9,000 per property to help businesses through to the spring; and

  • £594 million discretionary fund to support other impacted businesses.

This is in addition to the grants and funding already on offer, and the furlough scheme.

Full details of what is available and information on how to apply can be found at www.n-somerset.gov.uk/covidbusinesssupport

We will share more details of the new grants when more information is available.

Calling Little Bo Peep

On Wednesday, January 6, it was sheep in the meadow but no cows in the corn when we received reports of a pitch invasion at Nailsea & Backwell Rugby Club.

It prompted every pun known to sheepshearers and reached nearly 4,000 Nailsea People Facebook fans on social media.

Paul Mccullough said: “When caught they should be barrrred.”

But runner Lee Passco said he saw nothing while exercising that morning.

While others added a YouTube musical link to Beep Beep I'm a Sheep featuring

TomSka & the BlackGryph0n!

Mick Graham said: “Nailsea is starting to feel like the Scottish Highlands & Islands the amount of free roaming cattle and sheep we've had during the past couple of months.”

Beth Connock said: “It’s not the first time it’s happened.”

And when Linda Cripps captured a flock grazing on the field the rugby fans conceded the pitch invasions.

N&BAFC vice chairman Dave Hudson used the opportunity to spell out some rules.

He said: “Just a reminder that the rugby club is private land where children and adults play rugby.

“We request dogs are kept on their leads and that any dog mess is picked up by the owner and disposed of in the correct bins...not the club rubbish bins.

“Thank you for helping to keep the young rugby players of Nailsea & Backwell safe.”

UPDATE: Since publishing this on our Nailsea People Facebook page we have had reports of sheep getting out in the Backwell, Wraxall and Greenfield Playing Fields areas all belonging to different farmers. The photo by the stile is lambs getting out at The Elms

KEEP IT CLEAN